THE ROLLING STONES: BLUE AND LONESOME

THE ROLLING STOMES BLUE AND LONESOME (Universal Records)

For fans of Muddy Waters, B.B. King,

Of all the blues influenced rock bands to come out of England during the 1960’s, few perform American Blues music with the same authenticity as The Rolling Stones. Ever since the band’s early days when singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards bonded over their love for Blues artists like Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley, the Blues have been a big part of the band’s sound. On their first visit to the states in 1964 they included a trip to Chess Records in Chicago to record where their Blues heroes had recorded. They’ve introduced Blues artists to a whole new audience by taking them on tour and donated to Blues museums. They’ve even picked up the tab for the funeral expenses of Blues musicians when the musician’s family couldn’t afford it. Now for their most recent release the band has decided to release a whole album paying tribute to their Blues heroes. Entitled Blue and Lonesome, this record shows that even after decades of sold out tours and millions of records sold they really are just a bunch of guys that want to play the Blues.

The recent formula of an artist recording a “Blues Tribute album” when they’re unable to come up with new original material is a tired one, but here The Stones actually deliver! The band performs the songs on BLUE AND LONESOME (universal records) with a swagger that has long separated them from other Blues-based rock bands. The record kicks off with a cover of Little Walter’s “Just A Fool”. For those that are unaware Little Walter Jacobs was THE harmonica player on the Chicago Blues scene during the 1950’s and has even been called “The Jimi Hendrix of Harmonica”. While trying to match the exact sound and power of Little Walter’s playing is impossible, Mick Jagger gets a lot closer then you’d think. His own harp playing isn’t as flashy as Walter’s but it more than gets the point across.

Another stand-out track is the slow Blues “Little Rain”. Again The Stones come up big with their rendition of this lesser known Jimmy Reed tune. Playing slower tunes like this without losing the plot is usually tough on drummers. Fortunately for the Stones they have Charlie Watts behind the drums to keep them in-check. His laid-back drumming style perfectly fits this style of music by allowing the songs room to breath but without letting the bottom fallout.  Such is the same with the rest of the Stones on this record. “Less is more” is the name of the game with this band and even when Eric Clapton joins the party on “I Can’t Quit You Baby” and “Everybody Knows About My Good Thing” the focus is always on playing what’s best for the song.

Bottom line is BLUE AND LONESOME is an excellent record that shows us the Stones are still just a bunch of music fans trying to turn people on to the Blues.