THE ROLLING STONES: BLUE AND LONESOME

THE ROLLING STOMES BLUE AND LONESOME (Universal Records)

For fans of Muddy Waters, B.B. King,

Of all the blues influenced rock bands to come out of England during the 1960’s, few perform American Blues music with the same authenticity as The Rolling Stones. Ever since the band’s early days when singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards bonded over their love for Blues artists like Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley, the Blues have been a big part of the band’s sound. On their first visit to the states in 1964 they included a trip to Chess Records in Chicago to record where their Blues heroes had recorded. They’ve introduced Blues artists to a whole new audience by taking them on tour and donated to Blues museums. They’ve even picked up the tab for the funeral expenses of Blues musicians when the musician’s family couldn’t afford it. Now for their most recent release the band has decided to release a whole album paying tribute to their Blues heroes. Entitled Blue and Lonesome, this record shows that even after decades of sold out tours and millions of records sold they really are just a bunch of guys that want to play the Blues.

The recent formula of an artist recording a “Blues Tribute album” when they’re unable to come up with new original material is a tired one, but here The Stones actually deliver! The band performs the songs on BLUE AND LONESOME (universal records) with a swagger that has long separated them from other Blues-based rock bands. The record kicks off with a cover of Little Walter’s “Just A Fool”. For those that are unaware Little Walter Jacobs was THE harmonica player on the Chicago Blues scene during the 1950’s and has even been called “The Jimi Hendrix of Harmonica”. While trying to match the exact sound and power of Little Walter’s playing is impossible, Mick Jagger gets a lot closer then you’d think. His own harp playing isn’t as flashy as Walter’s but it more than gets the point across.

Another stand-out track is the slow Blues “Little Rain”. Again The Stones come up big with their rendition of this lesser known Jimmy Reed tune. Playing slower tunes like this without losing the plot is usually tough on drummers. Fortunately for the Stones they have Charlie Watts behind the drums to keep them in-check. His laid-back drumming style perfectly fits this style of music by allowing the songs room to breath but without letting the bottom fallout.  Such is the same with the rest of the Stones on this record. “Less is more” is the name of the game with this band and even when Eric Clapton joins the party on “I Can’t Quit You Baby” and “Everybody Knows About My Good Thing” the focus is always on playing what’s best for the song.

Bottom line is BLUE AND LONESOME is an excellent record that shows us the Stones are still just a bunch of music fans trying to turn people on to the Blues.

Merry Clayton: The Voice Behind the Hits

Merry Clayton

Late one night in 1969 singer Merry Clayton was just falling asleep when she received a call from record producer Jack Nitzsch.  Jack was in the middle of a late night studio session and was desperately looking for a female vocalist to add backing vocals on a track called “Gimmie Shelter”.  Very pregnant and not really in the mood to leave her warm bed, Merry listened while Jack tried to convince her that doing this session with a band called “The Rolling Stones” would be a great career move.  Merry finally agreed to do the session.  It didn’t matter that she’d never heard of the band and wasn’t familiar with their music,  Merry was a seasoned pro. This was just another session gig.  She went to the studio and nailed the track in three quick takes. Then, as quickly as she came in to the studio, she was out the door and gone in the night.  The song became a huge hit and has since become a staple of the Stone’s live show.  Even though it was her singing that took the song to the next level Merry couldn’t bring herself to listen to the track for many years. After her session with the Stones she had miscarriage and lost her baby.  It has been speculated that her vigorous singing on “Gimmie Shelter” contributed to the miscarriage.

Ever since her early performances in the Churches of New Orleans Merry has turned heads with her larger then life voice.  Her professional career started when she backed up Bobby Darin on some of his early recordings.  Form there it wasn’t long before she was selected to be a “Raelette” and sing backup for one of her main influences, Mr. Ray Charles.  Little did she know that singing backup for Ray was just the beginning.  In later years Merry would go on to sing backup for artists such as Joe Cocker, Neil Young, Carole King, Lynyrd Skynyrd and of course, The Rolling Stones.  Usually the most talented vocalist at whatever session she was working on, Merry signed with Lou Alder’s Ode Record label in the late 60’s. Working with music industry legend Lou Alder, Merry began what many thought would be a successful a solo career.  Unfortunately, her records didn’t sell and most of her solo recordings remain unknown and forgotten about by the general public. That is, until now…

Hopefully 2013 is the year the world will finally know Merry Clayton.  She is the subject of an excellent new documentary called 20 Feet From Stardom that follows the lives of some very talented backup singers.   In conjunction with the release 20 Feet From Stardom Sony/Ode Records has release a collection of Merry’s solo recordings called The Best Of Merry Clayton.  This collection covers most of Merry’s solo career and features soulful renditions of some popular classic rock songs.  One only needs to listen to a few minutes of Merry’s rendition of Neil Young’s “Southern Man” (the album’s opening track) to know that listening to Merry sing is a religious experience.   Very different then the original version, Merry screams and shouts her way through 3 minutes of soulful-funk!  The song takes on a whole new life when Merry screams “…I heard screamin’, bullwhips crackin’, how long is it gonna last?”.   Other great tracks on this album are her versions of Bill Withers “Grandma’s Hands”,  James Taylor’s”Country Road”, and of course the Stones’ “Gimmie Shelter” (her first Ode Records release).  In 17 great tracks you get to hear the voice that helped many artists take their songs to the next level.  Here’s hoping that someday soon Merry will reach the high level of stardom that she so rightly deserves.

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